A Quiet Summer

The Pandemic drags on and opportunities to get out and about to photograph the wildlife have been few and far between. A brief foray to Suffolk & Norfolk yielded little with many of the popular sites overwhelmed with holiday makers that should have been abroad staycationing instead – so just a couple of images – hopefully autumn and winter will bring a little more activity and perhaps a little more enthusiasm on my part.

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Olympus 300 + MC14 or Pana-Leica 100-400 ?

Following on from my post yesterday regarding getting extra reach out the excellent Olympus M Zuiko 300m f/4 Pro lens where I concluded that the MC14 and MC20 teleconverters do produce better image quality than simply cropping the image in post production, I thought it would be useful to look at the fifth option for getting extra reach namely not using the 300mm at all but replacing it with something longer.

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To MC or to Crop ?

As primarily a wildlife photographer my most used lens by some margin is the excellent Olympus M.Zuiko 300mm f/4 Pro.  For a 600mm full frame equivalent lens it is light and compact these being the key reasons why I use m43 cameras.  It is as sharp as any lens I have ever owned, including Canon’s big whites, and the optical image stabilisation combined with the IBIS of my OMD EM1 mkII is nothing short of astonishing.

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Yala Block 5

13 March 2020

This morning we returned to our preferred Yala Block 5.  It was a little quieter today perhaps due to the extreme heat which really does make a large part of the day fairly sterile when it comes to birding and no doubt the Leopards were also avoiding the heat and thus also us unfortunately.

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Yala Block 5 (Lunugamvehera National Park)

10 March 2020

A day in Yala.  Yala National Park is the second largest but far away most visited national park in Sri Lanka.  The park is split into a number of blocks some of which can be visted and some which cannot.  The vast majority of visitors to the park take a safari in Block 1, the coastal part of the park, the reason being that you supposedly stand the best chance of seeing Leopard which, for most people, appears to be all that they are interested in.  The result of this is that Block 1 is frankly over-run with jeeps which does tend to somewhat spoil the experience.

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