Wilpattu National Park – Day 2 (Birds Part 1)

27th February 2020

Today was a full day in the park i.e sunrise until sunset – 6.00am to 6.00pm, so an early start.

We arrived at the park entrance at about 5.45am and joined a few other “jeeps” waiting for the park to open.  Had this been Yala Block 1 there would have been many dozens if not hundreds of “jeeps”, fortunately Wilpattu is somewhat off the main tourist route and therefore is much quieter than Yala and all the better for it.  On reflextion we enjoyed Wilpattu far more than Yala and were really glad we included it in our itinerary, many do not.

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More Cabanes

More colourful Cabanes – this time in Le Chateau d’Oleron.  A number of these old Oyster farming cabins have been converted into artists studios whilst others remain in their original use, all in all a rather odd mix – still they do make good photographic  subjects although enough is enough and other subjects await.

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Wow !

The most striking building in the French coastal city of Royan is undoubtedly the Cathedral (église Notre-Dame) – it stands on the site of a former neo-gothic church that was destroyed in 1945 (as was much of Royan).  Designed by architects Guillaume Gillet and Marc Hébrard and built between 1955-58 entirely of concrete, it is considered one of the leaders of French contemporary architecture.

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Citadelle de Brouage

Founded around 1555 Brouage was at first the centre for European salt trading, before it became a military base under the drive of it’s governor: Richelieu.  It was once the most impressive sea-port of France and Louis XIV, today the bastion lies some distance “inland” surrounded by brackish marshes and provides some interesting photographic opportunities although is perhaps best appreciated from the air.

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Carrelets

Dotted along the banks of the Gironde Estuary are circa 400 wooden fishing huts which have been built on stilts. Their main implement is a square pulley-operated net (or “filet carré”) which has given the humble shacks their name “carrelets”.

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